Bitter Foods That Are Good for You

Bitter foods are amazingly nutritious and contain a wide variety of plant-based chemicals that have important health benefits.

Some of these benefits involve a lower risk of many diseases including cancer, heart disease, diabetes, better gut, eye, and liver health.

Below Are Bitter Foods That Are Good For health.

1.Bitter Melon

Bitter Melon
Bitter Melon

Bitter melon is a green, lumpy, cucumber shaped melon that tastes very bitter.

It’s seen in Asian, African, and Caribbean countries but less popular in other countries.

Bitter melon is stuff with phytochemicals like triterpenoids, flavonoids, and polyphenols that have been revealed to slow the growth of different types of cancers in both test-tube and animal studies. It’s can also be used in natural medicine to help lower blood sugar levels in diabetes patients.

One 4-week study discovered that eating 2,000 mg of dried, powdered bitter melon every day lowers blood sugar levels in people with diabetes though not as much as a popular diabetes drug.

A more comprehensive review obtained mixed results in humans and concluded that evidence is insufficient to suggest bitter melon supplements to people with diabetes.

Like most bitter foods, bitter melon is rich in antioxidants, which help prevent cell damage effected by free radicals and may decrease your risk of heart disease and diabetes.

2.Cruciferous Vegetables

Cruciferous
Cruciferous

The cruciferous species holds many bitter-taste vegetables including broccoli, cabbage, kale, arugula Brussels sprouts, and radishes.

These foods contain compounds called glucosinolates, which give them their bitter taste and are effective for many of their health benefits.

Test-tube and animal studies have shown that glucosinolates can slow the growth and increased of cancer cells, but these results have not been consistently replicated in human studies.

While some data recommends that people who eat more cruciferous vegetables have a lower risk of cancer, not all studies agree.

Some researchers believe that this inconsistency may be due to genetic differences among people, as well as natural variations in glucosinolate levels due to vegetable growing health and cooking methods. More research is needed.

In extension to their potential cancer-fighting effects, glucosinolates in cruciferous vegetables help your liver enzymes process toxins more efficiently, reducing their negative results on your body.

While no official recommendations have been set, some research suggests that eating at least five servings of cruciferous vegetables per week provides the most health benefits.

Dandelions are just a garden weed, but their leaves are edible and extremely nutritious.

Dandelion greens are medium-sized, green leaves with broken edges. They can be consumed raw in salads, sauteed as a side dish, or added in soups and pasta. Not mind its bitter taste, you can balance it with other flavors like garlic or lemon.

Though a short study exists on the particular health benefits of dandelion greens, they’re rich in many vitamins like Vitamin A, C, K, and minerals, including calcium, manganese, iron.

They also hold the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, which guard your eyes against cataracts and macular degeneration.

Finally, dandelion greens are a large source of prebiotics inulin and oligofructose, which improve the growth of healthy gut bacteria.

4.Citrus Peel

Citrus Peel
Citrus Peel

While the flesh and juice of citrus fruits like lemons, oranges, and grapefruits have a sweet or tart flavor, the outer peel and white pith are quite bitter.

This is due to the presence of flavonoids, which protect the fruit from being eaten by pests but have many health benefits in humans.

In particular, citrus peels carry a higher concentration of flavonoids than any other part of the fruit.

Two of the most sufficient citrus flavonoids are hesperidin and naringin both of which are powerful antioxidants.

Test-tube and animal research suggest that citrus flavonoids may help fight cancer by reducing inflammation, improving detoxification, and slowing the growth and spread of cancer cells, but human research is needed.

If you’d like to include citrus peel in your diet, it can be grated and enjoyed as zest, dried, and used in seasoning mixes or even candied and added to desserts.

5. Cranberries

Cranberries
Cranberries

Cranberries are tart, bitter red berries that can be enjoyed raw,  dried, juiced, or cooked.

They hold a type of polyphenol known as type-A proanthocyanidins, which can limit bacteria from sticking to surfaces, such as your bodily tissues.

This may be useful for decreasing bacterial tooth decay, lowering your risk of H. pylori infections in the stomach, and even preventing E. coli infections in your gut and urinary tract.

While many of these examinations were carried in test tubes or animals, results from human-based research are promising. One 90-day study discovered that drinking about two cups (500 ml) of cranberry juice every day helped eliminate H. pylori stomach infections three times more effectively than a placebo.

Other researches have shown that a daily dose of cranberry pills comprising at least 36 mg of proanthocyanidins can significantly decrease the frequency of urinary tract infections (UTIs), especially in women.

An extension of their antibacterial properties, cranberries are incredibly rich in antioxidants. In fact, they contain the highest concentration out of 24 of the most commonly eaten fruits.

This may describe why frequent consumption of cranberry juice has been linked to better heart health, including reduced inflammation, blood sugar, blood pressure, and triglyceride levels.

6. Cocoa

Cocoa
Cocoa

Cocoa powder is made from the beans of the cacao plant and tastes very bitter when unsweetened.

Usually used in a variety of desserts, it’s also combined with cocoa butter, cocoa liqueur, vanilla, and sugar to make chocolate.

A study has discovered that people who eat chocolate at least five times per week have a 56% lower risk of heart disease, compared to those who don’t eat chocolate at all.

This is possible due to the polyphenols and antioxidants seen in cocoa, which can widen blood vessels and decrease inflammation, protecting your heart.

Cocoa is also a great source of many trace minerals, including copper, manganese, magnesium, and iron.

Unsweetened cocoa powder, cacao nibs, and extra dark chocolate hold the highest amount of antioxidants and the least amount of sugar. Therefore, they make healthy additions to your diet.

7. Coffee

Coffee
Coffee

Coffee is one of the various universally consumed beverages and the top source of antioxidants in the American diet.

Like most bitter foods, coffee is packed with polyphenols that give the brew its different taste.

One of the richest polyphenols in coffee is chlorogenic acid, a strong antioxidant likely effective for many of the coffee’s health benefits, including decreased oxidative damage and a lower risk of heart disease and diabetes.

Studies reveal that drinking 3–4 cups of coffee per day can reduce your risks of death, cancer, and heart disease by 17%, 15%, and 18% each, compared to drinking no coffee at all.

A separate analysis discovered that each cup of coffee drunk per day reduces your risk of type 2 diabetes by 7%.

Some study also recommends that caffeinated coffee may help prevent neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, but more research is needed to understand why.

8. Green Tea

Green Tea
Green Tea

Green tea is another common beverage drunk around the world. It has a generally bitter flavor due to its catechin and polyphenol contents. The most well-known of these catechins is called epigallocatechin gallant, or EGCG.

Test-tube and animal studies show that EGCG can slow the growth of cancer cells, but it’s unclear whether it has the same effect in humans. While some study shows that regular green tea drinkers have a lower risk of growing certain cancers, not all studies have shown a benefit.

Green tea also contains a variety of polyphenols that act as antioxidants and anti-inflammatories. Together, these compounds decrease damage from free radicals and decrease inflammation, which may reduce your risk of heart disease. In fact, drinking just one cup of green tea daily is associated with a nearly 20% lower risk of a heart attack.

9. Red Wine

Red Wine
Red Wine

Red wine contains two types of polyphenols,( proanthocyanidins, and tannins) which give the wine its deep color and bitter taste. The mixture of alcohol and these polyphenols may reduce your risk of heart disease by decreasing cholesterol oxidation, decreasing blood clotting, and developing blood vessels.

Some research has also revealed that red wine may be beneficial for your gut. One study found that taking two glasses of red wine every day for one month raised the number of healthy gut bacteria.

These changes in gut bacteria were directly associated with lower cholesterol levels and reduced inflammation. Other benefits of drinking red wine include longevity, osteoporosis, and a lower risk of diabetes. Have in mind that drinking excess alcohol can lead to liver damage and other health problems, so moderation is important.

10. Bitter Garden Egg

Bitter Eggplants
Bitter Eggplants
The garden egg, also known as eggplant is a very beneficial source of dietary fiber, potassium, manganese, copper, and thiamin (vitamin B1).

It is a good source of vitamin B6, folate, magnesium, and niacin. Eggplant also holds phytonutrients such as nasunin and
 chlorogenic acid. Garden Eggs are one of the healthiest food you can eat.

Being among vegetable family, it contains nutrients that include better carotene, vitamins B6 E and foliate, calcium, iron, magnesium fiber, and many vital vitamins and minerals.

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